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Real ale. Real food. Real welcome.

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HISTORY OF THE CROSS TREE

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 The pub was built in 1841 as the New Inn, when it was a stone building with a thatched roof.

 

In the early 1900s the stone was probably used for something else, the pub was rebuilt in engineering brick and the roof slated.

 

In the 1970s two things happened – the pub passed to a new brewery, and Dutch elm disease killed the actual Cross Tree, which had been growing beside the Cross by the war memorial since the 1770s. The new brewery decided that the pub was a bit old to be a “New Inn” so held a competition to rename it. Guess what name won!

 

Our pub sign shows the ancient bartering Cross, with the elm tree and Saxon children and farmers looking at it, reflecting the fact that Byfield is a Saxon village.

 

There have been many publicans here over the years, and the current licensee has been here for over ten years.

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"We sponsor Byfield Athletic Football Club.  

It was 18 years since we had a football team in Byfield. Dave Jobbins and Jake Butler revived the club.

I wanted to show my support and commitment to the club by sponsoring them."

 

~ Glenys Smith

Team

Byfield Athletic Football Club 2014

Click photo to enlarge

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